Monthly Archives: September 2017

What lessons are to be learned from stakeholder engagement in transportation planning when broad efforts to engage fall short of actual public consultation?

In “Whose Opinion Matters: Lessons from a Stakeholder Engagement Process for Penang, Malaysia” Dr. Minal Pathak conducted an evaluation of the ongoing stakeholder engagement process for the transport master plan in Penang, Malaysia. Proposed funding for the plan’s estimated 11 billion USD cost – involving highways, roadways, LRT, monorail, a BRT network, and electric trams – was through reclamation of three islands along the Penang coast. Concerns about the plan raised by stakeholders range from high costs, environmental impacts, effects on fisheries, and aesthetic and heritage considerations. Key issues with timing, strategy and communication in the engagement process have contributed to various stakeholders’ continued opposition to the project. Dr. Pathak’s evaluation draws out recommendations for a more effective stakeholder engagement process that can be applied both within Malaysia and beyond.

 

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Griffin Smith (MCP2) spent the summer in Salt Lake City, Utah, working with the Environmental Dispute Resolution Program in the S.J. Quinney College of Law – University of Utah and the Environmental Planning Center at the The University of Utah. He mediated consensus-building efforts in underserved areas in the Mountain West. In particular, he focused on a rural Utahan community, helping it develop a regional plan, incorporate climate change projections into its efforts, and develop resiliency against other emerging challenges. As part of this, he supported community conversations about climate risks facing the vulnerable region around Zion National Park and piloted and tested climate communication methods. He also researched affordable housing policies for such gateway and amenity communities. He turned this work into a teaching roleplay for students learning about collaboration. In addition, he created a framework for a state civility initiative to restore and build civil politics and discourse in the state. Griffin’s work this summer builds off his previous work mediating conflicts at the Consensus Building Institute and studying public and environmental policy at MIT.

Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Kelly Heber Dunning

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Please join us in congratulating Dr. Kelly Heber Dunning, DUSP PHD Alumna ’16, on the announcement of her new role as Senior Fisheries Assessment Manager at the London-based MSC – Marine Stewardship Council. Her new position will draw on skills gained during her time as a collaborator with the Science Impact Collaborative, where she built skills in negotiation and dispute resolution in multi-stakeholder processes, practiced the use of best available science to generate policy, and as a pioneer DUSP student collaborator with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

Fisheries management is a complex, multi-stakeholder process where livelihoods, ways of life, food security, culture, ecosystem health and sustainability are all linked. Heber Dunning hopes that her work as part of the team at MSC will help to bring even more of the world’s fisheries into the category of “sustainable fisheries.”

Heber Dunning’s new position builds upon her doctoral dissertation research, “Communities of coral : an institutional and ecological analysis of biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services in Southeast Asia.” In her dissertation, she examined how differing models of ecosystem service management and biodiversity conservation efforts affected not only the marine habitats targeted for protection but also the geographically proximate communities’ social and economic welfare. To read more about Heber Dunning’s work click here. And keep an eye out for her forthcoming book based on this research through Anthem Press.

As part of a vast network of successful DUSP Alumni, Heber Dunning welcomes questions from DUSP students and alumni on pathways to careers in human dimensions of natural resources, specifically in the marine affairs world.