Monthly Archives: September 2013

Bringing Power to the People: Community-Scale Energy Efficiency Improvements

5641953722_9267e3147d_bMultifamily building residents—renters in particular—often fall through the cracks of traditional energy efficiency offerings. Building residents rarely have the ability or long-term incentive to pay for energy upgrades in their homes, and building owners have little motivation to reduce energy costs borne by residents. Standard utility energy efficiency programs—which rely mainly on financial incentives to encourage participation—have had little impact in encouraging efficiency.

 

Last spring, a group of DUSP graduate students devised a new model for multifamily energy efficiency in a practicum course led by Professors Harvey Michaels and Larry Susskind. The students proposed a solution that was based in equal parts on the use of non-financial incentives to encourage participation through a engaged city-scale implementer and community-based social marketing techniques, and the better use of building and energy consumption data to identify and target areas for potential efficiency improvements. By orienting program offerings around the social networks of communities and leveraging the energy data sources available to implementers, this model could unlock energy efficiency savings that have previously been off-limits to program administrators.

 

As a result of this effort, NSTAR and the City of Cambridge are working with MIT to scope out a pilot energy efficiency program in Cambridge that takes into account the added complexity of the multifamily sector. Read the group’s report here.

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Adopting a Low Carbon Energy System: How Four Nations Have Made the Switch

5032602590_d77d4f3c43_oClean energy has been a major topic of interest of late, but the pace at which major change has occurred has been frustratingly slow and it is often hard to see how a shift to low-carbon technologies could actually happen in practice. Fortunately, we are able to look abroad to a number of success stories that can demonstrate how major transformation in the energy sector might occur.
 
In her dissertation, Kathy Araújo (PhD 2013) offers a comparative case study analysis of four countries that have dramatically altered their energy industries to incorporate a new technology. Kathy studies biofuels in Brazil, wind in Denmark, nuclear power in France, and geothermal energy in Iceland and shows how—in less than 15 years—all four of these countries have more than doubled the use of these resources and reduced their use of fossil fuels by at least 15%.
 
The diversity of these case studies show that transformative change can happen in diverse contexts. Further, Kathy demonstrates that technological complexity does not need to be a barrier to the adoption of new technologies and that nations do not necessarily need to wait for these technologies to become economically competitive before working to bring them to scale. Read more about the possibility for large-scale transition to low carbon technologies in Kathy’s dissertation.